2017-2018 Seminar Series

Outrage to Action: Disrupting Inequity Through Teacher Education

In this year’s seminar, we will continue our close focus on teaching practice that advances equity and justice.  We seek to articulate and extend how we as teacher educators work with our candidates to ensure that they are equipped not only to enact equitable practice but also to disrupt patterns of inequity in our classrooms. We are asking our presenters to bring their perspectives to bear on this theme by selecting one high-leverage practice of teaching from the TeachingWorks list. Each speaker will investigate and illuminate the enactment of that particular practice of teaching, and expose the nuanced ways in which issues of equity and inclusion are fundamental to just practice. Further, our speakers will sketch the ways in which these practices are powerful levers for disrupting persistent patterns of inequality that exclude children and disenfranchise students in schools.

We are inspired by Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot’s argument that “We must shake our fists and raise our voices against inequalities and injustice.  Resistance and rage show we care.  And then we must transfer that outrage to action” (AERA 2017).  With concrete examples and stories, our presenters will help us understand and discuss the detailed ways in which teaching and teacher education can be disruptive.  We will ask our speakers to illustrate how they work with beginning teachers to ensure that these new educators are prepared with ways of relating and of acting in their practice to ensure that each of the young people in their classes thrives and grows as human beings.  Starting with a concrete description of the practice and what it looks like in real action, each speaker would examine core issues or imperatives inherent in the deliberate work of enacting the practice toward justice with students and different kinds of content.  The presentations will include concrete examples of our speakers’ teacher education practice – including lesson plans, video, details of assignments and units of their work to illustrate how we can teach novices to enact teaching that is disruptive, humanizing, and equitable. 

 

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Tuesday, September 12, 2017
On Becoming Sociocultural Mediators
Learning about students' cultural, religious, family, intellectual, and personal experiences and resources for use in instruction.
Informal lunch discussion of readings, 12-1, room 2229
Seminar 4-6 pm, Prechter

Sonia Nieto

Dr. Sonia Nieto has devoted her professional life to questions of diversity, equity, and social justice in education. With research focusing on multicultural education, teacher education, and the education of students of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, she has written or edited eleven books and dozens of book chapters and journal articles, as well as a memoir, Brooklyn Dreams: My Life in Public Education. Her classic text, Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education is now in its 7th edition (the 5th-7th editions were co-authored by her friend and colleague Patty Bode). The first edition (1992) was selected for the Museum of Education Readers’ Guide as one of the 100 books that helped define the field of education in the 20th century. She has been profiled in Inside the Academy http://insidetheacademy.asu.edu/sonia-nieto

Dr. Nieto has received numerous awards for her scholarly work, activism, and advocacy, including 8 honorary doctorates. Elected as a Laureate of Kappa Delta Pi (2011), and a Fellow of AERA (2011), in 2015 she was also elected a member of the National Academy of Education. She is currently working on a book about teaching with her daughter, Alicia López, also a teacher.

Dr. Nieto will join us for an informal lunch, which will be provided by TeachingWorks, from 12-1.  All you need to do is to RSVP here by Wednesday, September 6 and read one or both of the articles by Dr. Nieto. Information about articles will be shared by Simona Goldin one week before the lunch. As Dr. Nieto will be speaking from 4-6, she will not have any prepared remarks for this lunch event. Instead, she will join us for lunch and will engage in conversation and discussion with us, in consideration of our questions about her work.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2017
Necessary Disruptions: Examining Justice, Engagement, and Humanizing Approaches to Teaching and Teacher Education
Informal lunch discussion of readings, 12-1, Tribute
Seminar 4-6 pm, Prechter

Valerie Kinloch

Valerie Kinloch is the Renée and Richard Goldman Dean of the School of Education and Professor at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarship examines the literacies of youth and adults inside and outside schools, particularly in urban environments. Author of publications on race, place, literacy, and equity, her books include: Still Seeking an Attitude: Critical Reflections on the Work of June Jordan (2004), June Jordan: Her Life and Letters (2006), Harlem On Our Minds: Place, Race, and the Literacies of Urban Youth (2010), Urban Literacies: Critical Perspectives on Language, Learning, and Community (2011), Crossing Boundaries: Teaching and Learning with Urban Youth (2012), and Service-Learning in Literacy Education: Possibilities for Teaching and Learning (2015). In 2012, her book, Harlem On Our Minds, received the Outstanding Book of the Year Award from the American Educational Research Association, and in 2014, her book titled, Crossing Boundaries: Teaching and Learning with Urban Youth, was a staff pick for professional development by the Teaching Tolerance Education Magazine. Additionally, Valerie is the recipient of the 2015 Rewey Belle Inglis Award for Outstanding Women in English Education from the National Council of Teachers of English, and the 2010 Scholars of Color Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association. She has received grants from the Spencer Foundation, National Council of Teachers of English, Corporation for National and Community Service, and the Battelle Endowment for Technology. With colleagues, she participated in a Fulbright-Hayes project to Sierra Leone, West Africa to examine connections among language, culture, and history in Sierra Leone and the U.S. Gullah Sea Islands. Currently, she is completing book projects and community initiatives on literacy, justice, race, and engagement.

Dr. Kinloch will join us for an informal lunch, which will be provided by TeachingWorks, from 12-1.  All you need to do is to RSVP here by Tuesday, October 17 and read one or both of the articles by Dr.Kinloch. Information about articles will be shared by Simona Goldin one week before the lunch. As Dr. Kinloch will be speaking from 4-6, she will not have any prepared remarks for this lunch event. Instead, she will join us for lunch and will engage in conversation and discussion with us, in consideration of our questions about her work. 

Monday, November 13, 2017
When Celebrating Diversity Isn’t Enough: The Need for Racial Literacy in Our Schools
Implementing norms and routines for classroom discourse and work.
Informal lunch discussion of readings, 12-1, Tribute
Seminar 4-6 pm, Prechter

Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz

Professor of English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Yolanda is former Research Associate with the NYU Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, and has worked for Business Week, The New York Times, and New York University in Marketing and Promotion positions. Her research interests include racial literacy development in urban teacher education (with a specific focus on the education of Black and Latino males), literacy practices of Black girls, and Black female college reentry students. 

Yolanda’s work has appeared in several top-tier academic journals. Yolanda is co-editor of three books including (with Chance W. Lewis and Ivory A. Toldson Teacher Education and Black Communities: Implications for Access, Equity, and Achievement (IAP). At Teachers College, she is founder and faculty sponsor of the Racial Literacy Roundtables Series where for eight years, national scholars, doctoral, and pre-service and in-service Master’s students, and young people facilitate informal conversations around race and other issues involving diversity and teacher education for the Teachers College / Columbia University community. She is also the co-founder of the Teachers College Civic Participation Project which concerns itself with the educational well-being of young people involved with the juvenile justice and foster care systems in New York.

Yolanda and two of her students appeared in Spike Lee’s “2 Fists Up: We Gon’ Be Alright” (2016), a documentary about the Black Lives Matter movement and the campus protests at Mizzou.

Dr. Sealey-Ruiz will join us for an informal lunch, which will be provided by TeachingWorks, from 12-1.  All you need to do is to RSVP here by Tuesday, November 7 and read one or both of the articles by Dr. Sealey-Ruiz. Information about articles will be shared by Simona Goldin one week before the lunch. As Dr. Sealey-Ruiz will be speaking from 4-6, she will not have any prepared remarks for this lunch event. Instead, she will join us for lunch and will engage in conversation and discussion with us, in consideration of our questions about her work.

Monday, January 24, 2018
Designing lessons for a culturally relevant curriculum
Designing single lessons and sequences of lessons, with a focus on ethnic studies or culturally responsive curriculum
Informal lunch discussion of readings, 12-1,Brownlee
Seminar 4-6 pm, Prechter

Christine Sleeter

Christine E. Sleeter, PhD. is Professor Emerita in the College of Professional Studies at California State University Monterey Bay, where she was a founding faculty member. She has served as a visiting professor at several universities, including the University of Maine, University of Colorado Boulder, Victoria University of Wellington and Auckland University in New Zealand, San Francisco State University, and Universidad Nacional de Education a Distancia in Madrid, Spain. She is past President of the National Association for Multicultural Education, past Vice President of Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) of the American Educational Research Association, and a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. Her research focuses on anti-racist multicultural education, ethnic studies, and teacher education; her research in ethnic studies has helped support its recent expansion throughout California. She has published over 150 articles and 20 books, including Un-Standardizing Curriculum (2nd ed. with J. Flores Carmona, Teachers College Press) and Diversifying the Teacher Workforce (with L. I. Neal & K. K. Kumashiro, Routledge). Her newest book White Bread (SensePublishing), which is a novel, explores the profound impact of critical family history on teacher ethnic identity.

Dr. Sleeter will join us for an informal lunch, which will be provided by TeachingWorks, from 12-1.  All you need to do is to RSVP here by Wednesday, January 17 and read one or both of the articles by Dr. Sleeter. Information about articles will be shared by Simona Goldin one week before the lunch. As Dr. Sleeter will be speaking from 4-6, she will not have any prepared remarks for this lunch event. Instead, she will join us for lunch and will engage in conversation and discussion with us, in consideration of our questions about her work.

Thursday, March 22, 2018
Building respectful relationships with children: Disrupting inequity through teaching and teacher education practice
Building respectful relationships with children.
Informal lunch discussion of readings, 12-1 Tribute
Seminar 4-6 pm, Prechter

Ernest Morrell

ERNEST MORRELL is the Coyle Professor of Literacy Education and Inaugural Director of the Center for Literacy Education at the University of Notre Dame. He was formerly the Macy Professor of Education and Director of the Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is an elected member of the AERA Council, elected Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, past president of the National Council of Teachers of English, a member of the International Literacy Association’s research panel, and a co-convener of the African Diaspora International Research Network. In 2017 Ernest was ranked among the top 100 university-based education scholars in the RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings. Ernest is also the recipient of the 2017 Divergent Award for Excellence in 21st Century Literacies. His scholarly interests include: literacy education, media and popular culture, the African Diaspora, and global models of powerful leadership for city schools.
 
Ernest has authored 80 articles and book chapters and eight books including New Directions in Teaching English and Critical Media Pedagogy: Teaching for Achievement in City Schools, which was awarded Outstanding Academic Title by Choice Magazine of the American Library Association. Ernest has earned numerous commendations for his university teaching including UCLA’s Department of Education’s Distinguished Teaching Award. He received his Ph.D. in Language, Literacy, and Culture from the University of California, Berkeley where he was the recipient of the Outstanding Dissertation award in 2001. Ernest is chair of the Planning and Advisory Committee for the African Diaspora Consortium and he sits on the Executive Boards of LitWorld, the Center for Education Equity, and the Education for Democracy Institute.

Dr. Morrell will join us for an informal lunch, which will be provided by TeachingWorks, from 12-1.  All you need to do is to RSVP here by Thursday, March 15 and read one or both of the articles by Dr. Morrell. Information about articles will be shared by Simona Goldin one week before the lunch. As Dr. Morrell will be speaking from 4-6, he will not have any prepared remarks for this lunch event. Instead, he will join us for lunch and will engage in conversation and discussion with us, in consideration of our questions about his work.