Bob Bain and Elizabeth Birr Moje from the University of Michigan School of Education, along with Mark Windschitl from the University of Washington College of Education will discuss how their organizations train teachers to make content explicit through explanation, modeling, representations, and examples.

University of Washington presentation

University of Michigan presentation

 

 

Monday, April 28, 2014
4:10pm - 6:00pm

  • Bob Bain
    Associate Professor; Chair of Secondary Teacher Education, University of Michigan School of Education
  • Elizabeth Birr Moje
    Professor; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor; Associate Dean for Research and Community Engagement, University of Michigan School of Education
  • Mark Windschitl
    Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Washington College of Education

About the Speakers

Bob Bain

  • Associate Professor; Chair of Secondary Teacher Education, University of Michigan School of Education


Bob Bain is an associate professor of history education at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the School of Education and history department. A veteran high school history teacher and university professor, Bain studies teaching and learning of history across a variety of instructional settings, including classrooms, museums, and with technology. His research focuses on students learning history and teachers learning to teach history. His recent publications include “‘They Thought the World Was Flat?’ Principles in Teaching High School History” in How Students Learn: History, Math, and Science in the Classroom (2005) and “Rounding Up Unusual Suspects: Facing Authority Hidden the History Classroom” in Teachers College Record.

Elizabeth Birr Moje

  • Professor; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor; Associate Dean for Research and Community Engagement, University of Michigan School of Education

Elizabeth Birr Moje teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in secondary and adolescent literacy, literacy and cultural theory, and qualitative and mixed research methods. Her research interests revolve around the intersection between the literacies and texts youth are asked to learn in the disciplines (particularly in science and social studies) and the literacies and texts they experience outside of school. In addition, Elizabeth studies how youth make culture and enact identities from their home and community literacies, and from ethnic cultures, popular cultures, and school cultures. Her current research focuses on communities and schools in Detroit, Michigan, including a project in which she uses an array of methods to understand what motivates adolescents to persevere in the face of content literacy challenges. She is particularly interested in intervening on the complex relationship between the cognitive and linguistic demands posed by increasingly advanced content area reading and writing tasks of schooling and the motivational demands posed by adolescents' development and exploration of many different pathways to adulthood.

Mark Windschitl

  • Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Washington College of Education

Mark's research interests deal with the early career development of science teachers. His research group has recently received National Science Foundation funding for a five-year project to develop and study a system of tools and tool-based practices for early career and pre-service secondary science teachers that support transitions from novice to expert-like pedagogical reasoning and practice. These tools include: a video-based learning progression for teaching Model-Based Inquiry, discourse guides for core conversations in classrooms, rapid assessment models to tap student thinking, and rubrics to evaluate students' abilities to construct evidence-based explanations in science. The proposed system of tools will serve as a model for making pre-service teacher training and induction that is focused on student learning. This system of tools is designed to be responsive to all students in the classroom, including English Language Learners. The University of Washington research group Windschitl works with was recently given funding by the National Science Foundation for a five-year study. The study will develop and examine contrivances to help foster science teachers from novice-level skills to proficient pedagogical theories and practices. Windschitl has made more than 50 conference presentations and has been published more than 40 times in a variety of research, education, and technology journals both nationally and internationally. His research examines the growth and development of science teachers during the beginning of their careers. In 1995, Windschitl earned his Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from Iowa State University, having previously garnered a B.S. in zoology and an M.S.Ed. in research and evaluation. He has also received multiple awards for his research, including the American Educational Research Association’s Presidential Award for Best Review of Research (2003) and the Outstanding Reviewer Award from the American Educational Research Journal (2006).