The February 9, 2016 seminar featured Django Paris, associate professor of Language and Literacy in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University, and Maisha Winn, Susan J. Cellmer Endowed Chair in English Education and Professor of Language and Literacy in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.  Paris and Winn addressed the topic of relating to young people across difference, and will consider: What practices must novice teachers know – what might constitute a threshold for beginning practice – given diversity both within and across classrooms?  Building on this, the speakers proposed what it would take to generate agreement about this threshold across programs and contexts.

 

Relating to young people across difference from TeachingWorks at UMSOE on Vimeo.

Click here to view a copy of the presentation.

Article: "Toward a Restorative English Education"

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016
4:10pm - 6:10pm

  • Django Paris
    Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
  • Maisha Winn
    Susan J. Cellmer Endowed Chair in English Education and Professor of Language and Literacy, Department of Curriculum and Instruction

About the Speakers

Django Paris

  • Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education

Django Paris is an associate professor of language and literacy in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. He is also a core faculty member in the African American and African Studies Program and affiliated faculty in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures. His teaching and research focus on understanding and sustaining languages, literacies, and literatures among youth of color in the context of demographic and social change. He is particularly concerned with educational and cultural justice as outcomes of inquiry and pedagogy. Paris is author of Language across Difference: Ethnicity, Communication, and Youth Identities in Changing Urban Schools (2011), co-editor of Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry with Youth and Communities (2014), and has published in many academic journals, including the Harvard Educational Review and Educational Researcher.

Maisha Winn

  • Susan J. Cellmer Endowed Chair in English Education and Professor of Language and Literacy, Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Maisha T. Winn is the Susan J. Cellmer Distinguished Chair in English Education and Professor of Language and Literacy in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.   Professor Winn’s program of research examines the ways in which teachers and/or adult allies for youth in schools and in out-of-school contexts practice “justice” in the teaching of literacy.  Professor Winn  received the William T. Grant Foundation Distinguished Fellowship (2014) and the American Educational Research Association Early Career Award (2012).  She is the author of several books including Writing in Rhythm: Spoken word poetry in urban schools; Black literate lives: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives; Girl Time: Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline; and co-editor of Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Research (with Django Paris).  She is also the author of numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals including Review of Research in Education, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Race, Ethnicity and Education, Research in the Teaching of English, and Harvard Educational Review.