Betsy Davis, associate professor and chair of elementary teacher education, and Timothy Boerst, clinical associate professor, will discuss their work to identify the content of the practice curriculum to train elementary teacher candidates at the University of Michigan School of Education.

 

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Wednesday, May 23, 2012
3:10pm - 5:00pm

  • Betsy Davis
    Associate Professor; Chair of Elementary Teacher Education, University of Michigan School of Education
  • Timothy Boerst
    Clinical Associate Professor

About the Speakers

Betsy Davis

  • Associate Professor; Chair of Elementary Teacher Education, University of Michigan School of Education

Betsy Davis is a science educator and teacher educator whose research interests include teacher and student learning.  She has been instrumental in the recent redesign of the school's  Elementary Teacher Education program. The School of Education has been working for several years to reimagine teacher education. In the undergraduate elementary teacher education program, a new program is being piloted. The work on the program is driven by the desire to have a more deliberate and detailed focus on practice, as well as on content knowledge for teaching and the ethical obligations of the profession. The aim is to help interns learn how to do the work of ambitious elementary teaching.

Timothy Boerst

  • Clinical Associate Professor

Timothy Boerst is a clinical associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Education. In 15 years of elementary school teaching, Tim earned and renewed National Board Certification as a Middle Childhood Generalist, held multiple leadership positions in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and developed scholarship focused on mathematics teaching practice through the Center for Proficiency in Teaching Mathematics at U-M and the Carnegie Foundation. He studies teacher preparation and professional development through engagement in program and course design, teaching mathematics methods courses, and leading projects funded by NSF and IES focused on the design of professional development materials and the assessment of teaching practice. He earned a PhD in teacher education and a master’s in mathematics education from U-M.

Since joining the faculty at the School of Education, Tim has been heavily involved in the redesign of the elementary teacher education programs, first serving as coordinator of settings for teaching learning in the Teacher Education Initiative and currently serving as assessment coordinator for elementary teacher education programs. The aim of this work is to support the development, and appraise the progress, of beginning teachers who are pedagogically skilled, subject matter serious, and professionally committed to the learning of every student.